PROJECTS

Stream Restoration
The OLWC partners with the community on projects to improve the health and function of the Oswego Lake watershed. For examples of these projects, click on the links below:

Current Projects

Projects Prior to OLWC


Current Projects

2015 Watershed Enhancement Projects

The Oswego Lake Watershed Council (OLWC) is pleased to announce a partnership with the City of Lake Oswego to improve the watershed on three private properties within the Oswego Lake Watershed. Under changes in the Sensitive Lands ordinance the City Council directed Parks budget funds be directed towards public property to enhance and maintain the health of the watershed. These funds will also help private property owners enhance the health of the watershed on private lands. The City has contracted with OLWC to create a program that not only benefits the homeowner whose property contains natural watershed resources, but benefits the entire community by restoring a healthy functioning watershed as a common good.

OLWC, whose mission is to conserve, restore, enhance and maintain watershed functions to achieve and sustain a healthy watershed, identified three demonstration sites that would help the City achieve the goal of improving watershed function on public and private property throughout the City. The sites were chosen to demonstrate how this program would work for three property types of high environmental value in different areas of the city.

The criteria used to identify these sites were:

  • Property had running water at least part of the year (riparian sites)
  • Property was adjacent to City natural areas
  • Property was degraded by invasive species and other effects of urbanization

For these demonstration projects, the property owners were not involved in the selection of the sites. They were approached after their property was identified as being high value sites for enhancing watershed health. All three were happy to be involved in the demonstration projects.

To ensure longevity of the enhancement project, property owners sign an agreement to maintain the property in the future. The City provides OLWC funds to help with maintenance for three years following the initial work. Monitoring of the enhanced properties will take place beyond the three year maintenance timeline to ensure properties are not taken over by invasive species or become degraded.

Once these demonstration projects are done, the OLWC will work with Neighborhood Associations to identify properties that would benefit the community and provide a mechanism for property owners to apply for this program. Community members are welcome to help with OLWC projects. For further information visit: http://www.oswegowatershed.org.

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Springbrook Park Repair and Restoration

Friends of Springbrook Park provides ongoing preservation and protection services for this a 52-acre urban nature park (map), in partnership with the Uplands Neighborhood Association, the schools, and the City of Lake Oswego Parks & Recreation Department, which manages and maintains the park. Along with the Parks and Recreation Department, Friends organizes volunteers to remove invasive plants, restore and replant cleared areas, and improve and maintain trails. CLICK HERE to learn how you can be involved.

Friends of Iron Mountain “1000 Trees” Ivy Removal Events

Friends of Iron Mountain schedule work parties each Spring and Fall to remove invasive English Ivy – organizer Mick Buck reports “940  trees have been freed from their ivy encroachers so far.” CLICK HERE to learn how you can join this group for future events.

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5th Grade Watershed Program

The Oswego Lake Watershed Council (OLWC) has partnered with Friends of Tryon Creek State Park to develop a watershed field study program for all Lake Oswego School District fifth grade students.  This program has been designed to instruct the students on watershed function, particularly in areas where there is not a lot of impact from development.  As the students explore the park they are instructed on the function of plants and soils in maintaining clean water in streams, rivers and lakes.

6th Grade Watershed Program

The Oswego Lake Watershed Council has partnered with the Lake Oswego School District and Portland State University Center for Science Education to develop a place based watershed engineering and design curriculum for the 6th grade science classes at both Lakeridge and Lake Oswego Junior High Schools. This program links with the 5th grade experience through making comparisons between natural and urban/suburban watershed conditions.  The 6th grade students analyze their school campuses in order to understand the effects of the built environment on watershed function with a targeted focus on the effect of impervious surfaces.  The students then engage in engineering activities to create Low Impact Design (LID) mitigations for these impervious surfaces. The OLWC and City of Lake Oswego support this curriculum by supplying local learning materials including maps, rainfall data, and a 6th grade Watershed Design Manual adapted from the city’s materials.

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Springbrook Creek, in the Oswego Lake Watershed

Projects Prior to OLWC

Earth Day 2001 Project:
Springbrook Creek Clean-up Event

On Saturday, April 21, 2001 volunteers worked from 9:00 am to Noon:

  • ivy pulling
  • blackberry digging
  • trash pick-up

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2003 Springbrook Creek Fish Passage Project (REACH FIVE)

  • Project Need: A fish passage barrier was created by a 3-foot high dam forming an in-stream pond on Springbrook Creek.
  • Project Goals: The project goals were to restore fish passage through the site of an in-stream dam and pond.
  • Project Objectives: The project objectives were to use natural channel design techniques, remove the dam and in-stream pond, create natural riffle/pool sequence, improve fish and wildlife habitat, protect fish during construction, and meet ODFW fish passage guidelines.
  • Approach: This project is a demonstration of the successful application of a geomorphic approach to stream restoration using natural channel design techniques.
  • Project Funding: The City of Lake Oswego Engineering Division funded the project.
  • Project Management: The City Engineering Department established the restoration objectives, required the geomorphic approach, led the design team, reviewed the design, and inspected construction implementation.The City project manager was Andrew Harris. The Project Engineer and designer was Russ Lawrence, PE of Pace Engineers. Mr. Lawrence designed the step/pool sequence and low flow fish passage structures. Russ and Andy performed the geomorphic assessment and site survey.

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2003 Springbrook Creek Fish Passage Project (REACH ONE)

  • Project Site: This restoration was located below the railroad box culvert 750 feet above the mouth of Springbrook Creek on Oswego Lake (REACH ONE).
  • Project Need: A fish passage barrier was created 3-foot drop at the downstream lip of the railroad culvert. The depth of flow in the culvert prevented fish passage through the culvert during low flow conditions.
  • Project Goals: The project goals were to restore fish passage into the culvert and through the culvert during low flow conditions.
  • Project Objectives: The project objectives were to use natural channel design techniques, create natural step/pool sequence, improve fish and wildlife habitat, protect fish during construction, and meet Oregon Department of Fish And Wildlife (ODFW)  fish passage guidelines.
  • Approach: This project is a demonstration of the successful application of a geomorphic approach to stream restoration using natural channel design techniques.
  • Funding: The City of Lake Oswego Engineering Division funded the project
  • Project Management: The City Engineering Department established the restoration objectives, required the geomorphic approach, led the design team, reviewed the design, and inspected construction implementation. The City project manager was Andrew Harris. The Project Engineer and designer was Russ Lawrence, PE of Pace Engineers. Mr. Lawrence designed the step/pool sequence and low flow fish passage structures. Russ and Andy performed the geomorphic assessment and site survey.Fish passage barrier at railroad box culvert

Before Construction: June 1, 2000 (slides below)

  • The jump is 20-inches
  • The top of the jump is 15-feet wide.
  • The large boulder in the foreground of the photo is 13-feet from the opposite wall.
  • The culvert is 7-feet 9-inches wide and 7-feet 9-inches tall.
  • Low flows are very shallow across the flat bottom of the culvert.

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During Construction: September 16, 2003 (slides below)

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Post Construction (slides below)

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